PSYC 3810 CSI: Industrial Psychology
(Communication Skills Intensive)

Copyright 2007  David A. Wheeler, Ph.D., PHR, ACMT David@RelaxNow.Org   Last updated  08/30/2007 12:16 PM
Robert Morris University, Pittsburgh PA , USA

Game Overview

Everything in life is a game. In this game, the student chooses a numerical goal between 0 and 100 to achieve by the end of the semester. To achieve this goal, students complete tasks and are assigned points for how well they complete the task.

Players

    RMU Students: Plays to acheive the numerical goal they chose.
    Instructor: Guides students to earning points. Assigns points.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Course Description

PSYC 3230 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY is a study of the psychological principles applicable to problems in business and industry. The three main areas of study are: fitting the job to the person (job analysis, workplace design, equipment design, and worker safety); fitting the person to the job (testing, selection, placement, training, evaluation, and motivation of personnel); and organizational psychology (organizational structure, organizational development, leadership, and worker-management relations). Emphasis is on the methodology used by industrial psychologists.  The communication skills sections of this course place additional emphasis on demonstrating proficiency in reading, writing, listening, presenting, and group interaction within the context of the profession of industrial psychology as well as using appropriate technology to achieve these goals.   Prerequisite - PSYC 1010.

Course Objectives

 

Course Materials

Textbook: Landy, Frank J. and Conte, Jeffrey, M. (2004). Work in the 21st Century: An Introduction to Industrial and Organizational Psychology. McGraw Hill.

Course Rationale

Industrial psychology differs from management in that industrial psychologists focus on collecting data and developing theories about the psychology that influences the workplace. Management is more involved in the implementation of the theories in the daily functioning of the organization. The industrial psychologist collects and analyzes data and synthesizes the results into recommendations which are presented to management, workers, and labor unions for their approval and implementation.

Most of the communication skills projects will be related to communications that students will produce in the business environment. Additional projects will be required which reflect the communications of a professional psychologist.

In communicating to upper-level management, the purpose of the communications are usually to sell the managers on a new policy or procedure. At other levels of management, the purpose of the communications are to help implement policies and procedures. With unions, the industrial psychologist is trying to convince the unions of the fairness and rational behind new policies and procedures. Often the interactions with workers is collecting data from them either for personnel purposes -- hiring, evaluation, or training -- or for making recommendations for improvements in their working conditions. Additionally, industrial psychologists communicate with the employees to implement changes in the workplace. Industrial psychologists are also responsible for communicating their ideas in peer-reviewed publications and professional conferences.

The types of communications an industrial psychologist has to produce include both written and verbal communications. Written communications include: memos, email, classified advertisements, project reports, executive summaries of project reports, job analyses, performance evaluations, forms and tests used in recruiting, training documents, and scientific papers. Verbal communications include: project proposals, phone interviews, training, employee interviews, and scientific presentations.

By participating in the Communication Skills Program students will have extensive opportunities to develop competencies in researching, synthesizing, presenting ideas to, and listening to the various audiences they will encounter in this field. This will place them at a competitive advantage in the job search process.

This course is meant to be taken in the Junior or Senior year after taking General Psychology, Introduction to the World of Business and Management, and Communication Skills courses I-IV. The knowledge, comprehension, and application levels of Bloomís taxonomy for much of the content of industrial psychology are covered in management and marketing courses; so, the focus in this course will be mostly on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The content area of human factors, ergonomics, and worker safety are not covered in other courses at the college; so, more emphasis will be placed on those areas in this course. The Communication Skills Program courses I-V teach the basic goals of reading, writing, listening, presenting, and group interaction as well as using appropriate technology to achieve these goals. This course requires students to apply those skills to the specific content areas of industrial psychology.

Cognitive Domain (Bloom, 1956a)

By the end of the course, students will have:

c1. Knowledge of the terminology, rules of disciplinary discourse including knowledge of methodology, issues of proof, and central questions in industrial psychology.

c2. Comprehension of industrial psychology as demonstrated by their ability to translate industrial psychology theories into management theories and interpret raw data.

c3. Ability to Apply industrial psychology theories in specific scenarios and the ability to Apply the rules of disciplinary discourse in specific written and oral communications.

c4. Analysis skills for understanding the components of scientific writing, recognizing patterns in data, and identifying methods of persuasion used in advertising products for the workplace.

c5. Ability to Synthesize a scientific paper, employment interviews, tests, and performance evaluations.

c6. Ability to Evaluate the ergonomics of the workplace, theories of management, performance of other individuals, and employment forms.

Affective Domain (Bloom, 1956b)

During the course, students will demonstrate:

a1. A willingness to Receive information about industrial psychology, awareness of the viewpoint of industrial psychology, and attention to others while listening to presentations and group work, and an appreciation of cultural patterns exhibited by individuals from other groups.

a2. A willingness to Respond during classroom and group discussions and comply with the course syllabus and be satisfied with their responses.

a3. Acceptance of the Values of industrial psychology -- respect for the scientific method and concern for the individual in organizational decision making.

a4. Organization of their course work by the values of industrial psychology -- respect for the scientific method and concern for the individual in organizational decision making.

a5. Characterization by the values of industrial psychology as demonstrated by their willingness to question the scientific basis of claims made about the workplace and their consideration of the impact of management decisions on the individual workerís well-being.

Communication Skills Goal,

3. Skills for Critical Reading, Research, and Thinking

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to:

  • 3a. Analyze self-concept and explore its impact on communication in your field
  • 3b. Analyze the effectiveness of their own and others' communication strategies in your field
    • Students will do self-evaluation of their own communications and of others. The students will be evaluating rough drafts of each otherís term paper and oral presentation.
  • 3c. Analyze the source of communication problems, including cross-cultural misunderstandings.
    • Differential validity. Interview situations. Performance appraisal.
  • 3d. Apply and analyze the principles of audience analysis to a variety of audiences and situations in order to determine appropriate communication strategies.
  • 3e. Perform sustained library research using both print and electronic sources for in-depth programs such as case studies, critical essays, and reports.
    • Introduction to research paper. Internet search exercise.
  • 3f. Select appropriate media for communication with others, including intercultural audiences.
  • 3g. Demonstrate self-confidence in these skills areas as related to their majors and their career goals.
    • Self-confidence will be part of the evaluation criteria for the assignments.

4. Skills for Communicating

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to:

  • 4a. Apply, analyze, and evaluate communication strategies appropriate to their disciplines or professions for resolving communication problems, including cross-cultural misunderstandings.
    • Definition of legally protected groups, differential validity, biases in hiring and performance evaluation.
  • 4b. Create communications that are clear, coherent, and logically sound.
    • This will be part of the evaluation criteria for the assignments.
  • 4c. Demonstrate a command of standard written and spoken American English, including accuracy in spelling, grammar, and pronunciation.
    • This will be part of the evaluation criteria for oral and written assignments.
  • 4d. Prepare all writing necessary for job searches including resumes and letters of application, and conduct themselves effectively during the interviewing process.
    • Students will be required to have a resume with them at all times in the classroom. Link to student syllabus. This will be used during student presentations in the classroom. Every time a student give a presentation in front of the classrooms, another student will introduce them with information gleaned from the resume. This is part of the activity for communication skills goal.
    • Mock hiring exercise.
  • 4e. Use appropriate computer software and other electronic media to create professional reports and presentations, including illustrations and visual aids.
    • This is part of the evaluation criteria for verbal and written communications. Additionally, students are required to correspond with the professor and with other students using email. Email exercise written.
  • 4f. Use computer software to create appropriate support materials for presentations.
    • This is part of the evaluation criteria for verbal and written communications.
  • 4g. Demonstrate self-confidence in these skills areas as related to their majors and their career goals.
    • This is part of the evaluation criteria for verbal and written communications.
  • 4h. Demonstrate active listening skills in their attempts to persuade others.
    • This is part of the evaluation criteria for the mock interviews.

Skills for Communicating in Groups

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to:

  • 5a. Apply communication principles that underlie group problem-solving and decision making.
    • One of the course topics is group dynamics. The following course topics relate to this communication skills goal: group think, group maturity,. The students will be working in groups of 4-5 students during the entire semester. Many of the assignment will be done by the students working in groups. The students will have plenty of opportunity to apply these skills during the semester.
  • 5b. Apply principles of leadership to motivate groups to achieve organizational objectives.
    • Course topic: leadership, motivation. Opportunity for applications in the base groups.
  • 5c. Apply strategies for managing apprehension, aggression, and conflict in group interactions.
    • Course topics: group interactions and conflict. Opportunity for applications in base groups.
  • 5d. Apply strategies for negotiations in group interactions .
    • Course topics: group facilitation, consensus making.
  • 5e. Participate appropriately in all kinds of professional groups.
    • Actively encourage students to participate in the student professional group appropriate to their major. There will be announcements made in class of events related to any of the student organizations represented in the class. Credit will be given for students who are members of an appropriate professional organization.
    • Introducing other students.
    • Professional presentation of research paper.
  • 5f. Demonstrate self-confidence in their applications of communications skills in professional groups.
    • Self-confidence will be part of the evaluation criteria for the news group assignment, speaker moderator assignment, and professional presentation.
  • 5g. Demonstrate active listening skills in their interactions within groups
    • This will be part of the evaluation criteria for group participation
[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Grade Weighting

Content Objectives
Percent Activity  
15% Written Communications  
10% Verbal Communications  
20% Weekly Quizzes Make-ups given when they fit in the class schedule.
15% Attendance  
Communication Skills
Percent Activity  
10% Written Communications  
10% Verbal Communications  
5% Group Interactions  
2% Professionalism  
1% Self-Concept and Self-Confidence   
2% Class Participation  
10% Attendance  
[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]

 

Home ] Return ]

Send mail to CompanyWebmaster with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright © 2005 CompanyLongName
Last modified: 10/04/05